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20121129
20121207
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MSNBCW 5
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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
republicans. it was supported by senator john mccain, himself a disabled veteran. >> bob dole has been our leader on the issue of disabilities from the moment he stepped foot into the chamber. to bob, it is unthinkable that americans could not get over a curb or enter a school building or even watch a debate in this chamber if they were in a wheelchair. >> but that was not good enough for 38 of john mccain's republican colleagues, including his usual ally, lindsay graham. treaties take years to negotiate before they come to a vote. this treaty, though signed by president obama, was actually negotiated by president george w. bush. but that was not good enough for 38 republicans. republicans made up transparently ridiculous reasons to vote against it. they said it threatened america's sovereignty, even though senator kerry repeatedly showed them that the treaty requires no changes in u.s. law and that the treaty cannot be used as the basis for a lawsuit in u.s. courts. the opponents said it was inappropriate to consider a treaty ma post election lame duck session, never mind that just since
and this senate in an exceptional way. his name is bob dole of russell, kansas, who served in world war ii, was severely disabled, came home uncertain of his future but dedicated his life to public service. i don't know how many weeks or months or years are left in bob dole's life, but he has made the passage of this convention on disabilities his life's work of the moment. we owe it to bob dole, to all of the disabled veterans like him who stand with locked arms begging us to pass this convention, we owe it to the disabled people across america and around the world to stand up once and again for the rights of the disabled and for expanding opportunity not just in america, but across the world. people say we are an exceptional nation. there's a little bit of aoeg ism in that -- egotism in that statement, but i believe it is -- i ask for 30 additional seconds. but i believe it is factual that america is an exceptional nation twhe steps forward in the -- when it steps forward in the belief that freedom, liberty and opportunity should be for everyone within our country and around the world. t
mitchell, bob michaels, and bob dole. there is no question none of this could have happened without them coming to the table and understanding how important it was to achieve a result. i also have to emphasize what i believe is the fundamental catalyst for all of this. that is there was a president who was determined to solve this issue. absolutely determined. as we see, not only was he willing, but he ended up sacrificing tremendous political capital, personal political capital in order to do what he felt the country needed at that time. there are a lot of folks who like these kinds of agreements to take place in a climate where there are no politics. it will never happen. it will never happen because politics is the cement that holds the system together, not what divides it. in my opinion, there are three political aspects that have to be looked at in what happened in 1990 and certainly have parallels to what is going on today. there are the politics of the differences in philosophy. there certainly is a liberal perspective, generally attributed to the democratic party, a conservative
." andrea, chime in here. despite a dramatic appearance from 89-year-old former senator bob dole, the senate failed to pass a u.n. disability treaty by just five votes. combat veterans like senators john mccain and john kerry delivered impassioned speeches, but dissenting voters said the treaty could pose a threat to national sovereignty. this is a stretch. more than 150 countries have signed the treaty designed to create unilateral rights for people with disabilities. it's actually based on america's ada act which bob dole helped pass more than 20 years ago. and you know, andrea, watching this american hero on the floor, a guy who is disabled, left part of himself, as he has said and others have said, on the battlefields of western europe, coming in and making a plea. i'm really surprised that this was killed by fringe concerns, fringe, fringe concerns. >> and it was, in fact, his fellow senators, several of the people who served with bob dole, who were the key votes here. and john kerry was leading it on the floor with john mccain. it was one of those bipartisan coalitions of veterans, wou
leader bob dole. he's making a rare visit to the senate floor to make his case. and now that we've had a whole month to digest that election day data, where you'll find those who voted for every presidential winner since 1956. that's in today's deep dive. i'm chuck todd feeling a little clogged up as you might hear. the fiscal cliff counteroffer has one thing in common. the differences between the new republican plan and what the white house proposed are stark when it comes to taxes. the gop calls for $800 million in new taxes. it's half of what the white house asked for. republicans to $67 billion. the gop plan changes how security benefits would be calculated. why he favors tax rates instead of eliminating deductions. not enough revenue. less revenue equals more cuts in education. republicans ruled that out saying the new revenue would not be achieved through higher tax rates which we continue to oppose. they were referring to an erskine bowles plan that he testified to in the fall of 2011. the white house made it clear that's a nonstarter and they won't even respond until the gop pu
handicap rights which people like bob dole fought for, so you can get a wheelchair in the hotel, you can move around and be your own person if you have a handicap, i have seen friends of mine do it. they can get everywhere because of the laws. and i know clint eastwood doesn't like these laws but tough. then you get to -- they want to extend it to europe, other countries we can travel, so people in this country can travel to those countries knowing they're not going to be handicapped any more than they are by facilities. why would a republican vote against such a deal? you first and then john. >> there's a lot of pressure from the right on this. there's the paranoia from the u.n. >> explain it. >> the notion that the u.n. is going to come in and tell us what to do. the fact of the matter is this treaty raises the world to the standard of the u.s. doesn't require the u.s. to change its standards at all and doesn't in any way give the u.n. power to do anything in this country. but i think it's -- all you have to do is say u.n. and people on the right get very exorcised. rick santorum helpe
bob dole was using against bill clinton. i think we made some progress in other areas including environmentally. >> barney frank talking in his sleep. >> hadn't even noticed that through the glare on the glasses. barney frank, a great congressman and a great guest, even with his eyes closed. >>> and who can forget this moment following the iowa caucuses. >> if you had told us one year ago we would come in third in iowa, we would have given anything for that. and you know something? you know something? not only are we going to new hampshire, tom harkin, we're going to south carolina and oklahoma and arizona and north dakota and new mexico. we're going to california and texas and new york. we're going to south dakota and oregon and washington and michigan, and then we're going to washington, d.c. to take back the white house! yeah! >> it was the scream that defined howard dean's ill-fated candidacy. intense to borderline manic. research conducted for a group called media cultured society shows it was his microphone because it only picked up his remarks for tv, not the crowd's bois
with bob dole and pete domenici and other members of the republican side that cared about the budget. and on the house side, he asked us to deal with new gingrich so i had an informal arrangement with both new gingrich and gramm that we would run the process for them and they would participate in the negotiation but when we got to the point we felt the president was willing to compromise on issues, we would run that process through them. the first agreement was achieved. and as it has been noted, had no increase in tax rates. no increase in tax rates. the additional revenue was generated by mostly consumption taxes on gasoline, luxury taxes. there were additional revenues specifically fenced off for social security which were i believe produced by increasing the payroll tax. there were additional revenue is fenced off for medicare by extending the cap on medicare and that time medicare had a cap but all of the other taxes that were in there were primarily related to use or consumption. it met the criteria established by the republicans in the senate and the republicans in the house.
foley and george mitchell, bob michaels, and bob dole. there is no question none of this could have happened without them coming to the table and understanding how important it was to achieve a result. i also have to emphasize what i believe is the fundamental catalyst for all of this. that is there was a president who was determined to solve this issue. absolutely determined. as we see, not only was he willing, but he ended up sacrificing tremendous political capital, personal political capital in order to do what he felt the country needed at that time. there are a lot of folks who like these kinds of agreements to take place in a climate where there are no politics. it will never happen. it will never happen because politics is the cement that holds the system together, not what divides it. in my opinion, there are three political aspects that have to be looked at in what happened in 1990 and certainly have parallels to what is going on today. there are the politics of the differences in philosophy. there certainly is a liberal perspective, generally attributed to the democratic
an incredible job. chris, i would say, we are with two senators now, and i am always reminded of when bob dole in 1968 left the house to go to the senate, he said in that single act he enraged the intelligence of both bodies. bob corker is from the state that i think has produced more interesting and important politicians over the last 40 years than any other in america, even though it is a relatively small state. howard baker and al gore and now bob corker -- it really is an incredible testament to your state. it probably goes back to the tensions during the civil war -- east and west and all that. >> probably does. >> and mark warner, probably more than anyone, tom davis is encyclopedic on everything political, but mark warner probably more than any single figure has taken his state of virginia from a fairly reliable red states to a state that i would call almost a slight bluish purple. he left the governor's office seven years ago. he has been out of state government for seven years. he is the most popular figure in the state of virginia, and has been throughout that entire time. not only h
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)